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Wrapping up

Posted on January 06, 2015 by Dan Varian

2014 was definitely peaks and troughs. It started really well with things like Capability Brawn 8B, and a trip to Ireland in February where I had loads of fun mucking around and climbing in every kind of weather. Glenn Ross 8A+/B was the highlight of this trip, it is one of the UK's nicest power problems. no messing around just big drop clutch board moves with a dabble of technique for one move. I climbed it on my first day there as the rain came in. The rest of the trip passed by with some great banter.

 

Katie and I headed to font the week after Ireland. Climbing at Fairhead couldn't be more different to font and the first day or so in font was a shock to the system. I had a brilliant trip though with there being some great days despite it being a little warm. It was the type of trip you get very rarely and it's one i'll remember for a long time. Made all the better by the company we kept out there.

After font things went pretty rubbish for a few weeks after getting the flu and something seemed to linger on for months meaning i needed lots of rest days throughout the summer to keep a half decent level up. Despite this i tried hard to keep things interesting and just made sure i stayed on reasonably subtle and finger friendly rock types. This was a tough time for me after climbing so well at the start of the year and i felt like it took quite a bit of resilience not to get really frustrated with what was happening at times. Luckily i'd found a few lines which were still possible for me and put some others on the back burner for a while. One of them was a line i'd tried last year but written off as too hard at height. I decided to work it on a rope quite a bit and see how it felt, some big links came quite quickly and i sorted out a strategy for committing to the top out. Highballing is something i like to push myself on every once in a while. Highballs can be deceptive though as it's often the height of the crux which determines the true difficulty of the boulder. Pushing the height of highball cruxes is something i've been sporadically keen on over the years, as well as ground upping highballs and trad routes in that style. Of all the UK hard highballs and short solos i've had a good bit of fun over the years. Things like superbloc GU 2nd ascent, careless torque GU, the prow, 2nd ascent, lanny bassham 2nd ascent, the darkside, GU 2nd ascent, Empty the bones of you FA, queen kong GU FA arc royal FA crack in the shadows FA, as well as easier climbs like The Young 2nd asc, Earthboots GU solo, Unfamiliar GU, toyboy GU, and many more 7B+,7C highballs and trad routes (living in oxford, navana and nefertiti all GU same day as voyager). There are still plenty of great 8's i'd love to do like Sampson, Pebbledash, high fidelity) etc.

With the crux of what became Hobbie Noble at 9m it was ultimately the hardest highball i'd ever approached (the crux of things like living in oxford and unfamiliar are 7B+ish with their cruxes at 3-4m and they are well protected near the top, Darkside and the prow are font8a ish with unprotected cruxes in the 5-6m zone, Empty the bones of you (8A+ish) has the crux in the 7m-ish zone for hands.) Hobbie felt like slopey font 7B+/C top out and 7m of font 8A/+ climbing to get to the start of that. It seems like people just assume that everything is safe with pads if it is given a highball grades when that's not truly the case, they just give a better impression of overall difficulty to the modern climber.

For example New satesman and Gerty Berwick both get E9 yet one is ~7B and one is ~8A/+ both have good landings with enough pads, (provided you are spotted off the block on NS) I've fielded a fall from ~9m off new statesman and he only landed on one pad and walked away with a bit of whiplash. The crux of NS is at 4m and the crux of Gerty is around 5m. By comparing these side by side routes to me a ground up ascent of Gerty would be a much better effort yet in E grades there is little way to tell that difference. I'm just trying to illustrate how things have moved on in highballing as on both climbs a groundfall is pretty much guaranteed up to 7m-ish

Anyway it's something to be aware of when ground upping a climb. As i learnt this year when i badly bruised my talus bone from only a 2m fall. If you're 100% guaranteed to hit the ground. At some point the odds of a perfect fall will stack against you and something will end up hurting for a good while. I was really glad to get Hobbie done safely on a really nice breezy day just hanging out up there with Micky and Dexter. It's in nowheres-ville but it might just be the most perfect problem i ever do. Hard, commiting, good rock and great moves from start to finish, good landing. Definitely the highlight of my year all in all. 

 

After doing Hobbie and things like Wilson at st Bees, along with Establishing and repeating some lovely 7&8's in Scotland. The highlight of which being Veinglorious 8A+ at Reiff, a close compression line of marginal pinches. I did some exploring around the Arrochar Area and Dumfries. I found some incredible projects which i'm dying to get back to. this one is all of 5 minutes from the road and the huge 55˚ front face has one perfect line snaking across it. I managed the moves on it whilst Katie was at the Womens symposium at TCA and am looking forward to heading back.

 

General round up/ discussion of UK bouldering this year (exclusive material! thanks to not a single sentence being mentioned about it in the BMC or UKCs wrap up of 2014s climbing highlights) i've squashed it into a paragraph.

Pete Robins put up lots of great looking new 8's in wales, Jemma Powell putting up the hardest UK boulder problem FA by a woman and becoming the third to climb 8A in the UK (http://northwalesbouldering.com/index.asp) Mike adams as ever putting up some great looking things in the east peak, scotland (https://vimeo.com/user7044532) and NYM. Dan Turner's really cool looking new 8B in the North York Moors looks to be a stand out line (http://instagram.com/p/txxwCXkQZA/?modal=true), Ned, Tyler and Tom Newman putting up great looking grade 8's in the peak (beastmaker blog and toms vimeo https://vimeo.com/user17752633, http://tv.thebmc.co.uk/video/tyler-landman-first-ascent-of-smiling-buttress-curbar), Alex Gorham getting out and exploring hard lines in Scotland (http://stonecountry.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/driest-september-2014.html). James Squire putting up a brace of great looking 8's on Dartmoor granite (picking up where Mike left off after a flying visit). Peckitt finding some classic grade 8 lines in yorkshire right under everyones noses (http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=69238) Lakes hard developments (lakesbloc.com)

After looking at all those I'm left thinking, bloody hell this has been an impressive year for hard bouldering development and repeats in the UK, and i've missed out quite a few ascents there i'm sure. One thing which is obvious is that there has been a really noticeable ground swell of ascents in the 8A-B area.

It seems to me there has been a decent amount of bouldering development in the UK this year in all corners. new 8Bs in Northumberland, Cumbria, North Yorkshire, Wales and many interesting repeats. Really cool new 8's in the peak. 2 new guidebooks to North york Moors and Lancashire. Maybe it's because 8B isn't news outside the UK anymore with people flashing them and kids climbing them. To maybe put things in perspective i've done a little numbers exercise below.

There are currently 50 independent straight up grade 8's in my home climbing area of Northumberland, of which i did my first one in 2005. This year it'll have taken me 10 years to hopefully tick those 50 and maybe a few more can be added (~thirty of them are my doing already so i'm not doing myself any favours by saving the last 3 repeats for years) In a twenty day climbing trip to font this year i climbed 21 8's from 8A-8B which going by some very crude calculations, in a perfect world, that really means that in those last 10 years i could potentially have climbed 3832 grade 8 climbs! In reality in the UK i've climbed over 150, v few of which are link ups or traverses, a figure which looks quite crap next to the theoretical one yet it looks to be the most in the UK of all time on paper. Obviously the calculation is a totally flawed number but maybe it gives some sense of theoretical potential given endless rock, good weather and full time climbing and the actual effort it can end up taking to repeat and establish things sometimes.

 Something else tells me that if the Big Orange had been given E9/10 and Hobbie Noble had been given E9/10 they'd be seen as more of a big event. Smiling Buttress a grit LGP of the highest quality is a real stand out point in the year too. To me this is maybe one illustration of how much of bouldering is lost in the translation of general news reporting. Things like the Big Orange and Smiling Buttress getting given 8A mean it is all to easy for people to overlook them by not fully understanding what that grade means at height or in a single move at the top of a problem. Hopefully this quick few paragraphs can give a better sense of how active and diverse our climbing population has been this year.

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Last few months

Posted on August 29, 2014 by Ned Feehally

It feels like Autumn is drawing slowly in now so I thought i would summarize my recent spring/summery goings on.

Back in April I managed to cash in on the last of the cold weather over in North Wales:

Compact Culture from Ned Feehally on Vimeo.

I had tried this years ago and failed, so it was nice to go back up there and get it boshed off. Partly to get a quality problem ticked off and partly to see the progress in my climbing (ability to crimp really hard) that this represented.

 

After this I played around on a few projects in the peak. First up was Big Willy Attitude at Stanage: 

big willy attitude from Ned Feehally on Vimeo.

 

 

I spent a bit of time at Eastwood with Jon Fullwood as it began to warm up. Jon has put in a huge amount of effort tidying up the crag and removing a load of rubble from the landings. Many of the problems now climb better as a result. Jon is a real hero of the Peak district - always out searching and developing, constantly tinkering and adding problems for everyone else to enjoy. Jon is also very generous with handing over projects to others as well - I owe many of my first ascents to him and his keen eyes. 

Anyway, enough of that. We spied a new one at Eastwood - basically a high level start to the Eastwood traverse. After much head scratching, crimping and double knee barring we cobbled a brilliant sequence together. It is probably font 8a, but maybe french 8b+reflects the difficulty a bit better as it is pretty long. It's called Bone Machine

 

After this it was off to Magic Wood. I have been a couple of times before and always came back feeling like I had been ripped off in thinking that it is a summer venue. Yeah, certain problems are coolish and the holds are generally positive so you can climb some bits, but if you don't get on with the heat then it just isn't fun! I got up some things but mainly got frustrated with the heat and humidity:

I was pleased to flash Jack's Broken Heart tho. I had always told myself I would "save it for the flash" on previous trips and it was good to finally step up to the plate and get it done, and not save it for another 3 years!

 

Since returning home I have mainly been training but I managed to nip up a project at Ramshaw one blustery day between showers. It is a great line on a lovely tall wall (just below Ramshaw Crack). It's a real treat to find something of this quality, at a reasonably popular crag that is still unclimbed (the photo doesn't really do it justice)...

 

It is pretty highball with the crux move right near the top - slapping from the thin crimp rail up to the chalked jug above. It felt round about font 7c. I top roped it and then climbed it above 2 mats (there isn't any gear) but now it is clean it is prime for a ground up ascent - get to it! 

As usual, finding a good name is often harder than climbing the problem. I'll come up with something soon...

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Fun in the north.

Posted on June 05, 2014 by Dan Varian

Climbing for me seems to have a way of aggregating aims from seemingly chance events as time passes, a quick flick in an old magazine here or a flick through a guide book there. A conversation with friends about some crag i haven’t even thought of for years. Sometimes the aims build to become a solid one or sometimes they just drift by in the background. Slow burners. One such project for me was a line of veiny rock at Reiffs bouldering cliffs. Last year i spotted this incredibly obvious line the day i climbed helicoidal flow and Rubha Dubh Dubh. I felt the holds and suspected it’d go. Quite why nature felt like producing a wall with all these perfect holds i don’t know but in my eyes they are some of the best lines in the uk because they exploit incredibly subtle features that hardly ever occur on overhangs. I didn’t know if i’d get back there to try it but i logged it in the back of my mind, ready for serendipity to build it into a reality if everything conspired.

 

 

Reiff was a lovely breath of fresh air that comes from ranging further afield, out of my local crag comfort zone.

As i’ve got older i’ve got fussier as to what to spend my free time on. I still love bouldering on hard lines more than ever but as i climb more and more, i’m inevitably left with those 2 choices that face you in local areas. Change tack and climb different lines/ styles or get stronger for the bigger gaps. A number of projects in Northumberland are currently that bit too testing for me and they are of radically different styles which aren’t necessarily what i’m great at, one involves at least 8B slab skills and mono pock crimping and the other involves wild compression on slopers and obtuse angles. Interestingly the UK’s hardest proven slabs are in the 7C+ region on boulders and there are few of those about. True compression wise our hardest problems max out at 8A+. Font has loads of compression climbing upto 8C so why are we so far behind? well partly its the rock but mostly it is our history, Compression has never really been in vogue in the UK, it was all about crushing small holds 10 years ago and in many respects it still is now. The same goes for slabs, in Font there’d be far fewer hard slabs without the LeDenmats passion for the mighty Dalle.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/beastmaker/14027745607/

Its with this in mind that makes me really happy to go out developing with other climbers. Everyone is looking for something different that inspires them when the rock is a blank canvas. Tom “Gangle” Newman has turned his hand to putting up new problems in the peak since moving to Nottingham with much success. He’s been hoovering up old projects all over the spot.

Tom was my raiding partner for a quick trip north of the border in May and upon arriving at Reiff he immediately spotted a line between the obvious ones i’d seen. Wide moves off few holds. At first i was a tad sceptical that it’d go as it’s a line i would never have spotted immediately, its the type of thing i’d have ended up playing on after being at the crag for ages. Yet it ended up climbing superbly, taking a line through the blankness that was super impressive in it’s board style and pureness. Tom got very close on our day trip but the rub of the green wasn’t with him for the full send. It’s always the way in climbing. I can say this smugly as i was fortunate to just be on the other side of the coin on my chosen project. Just scraping out an ascent which felt much like chucking a dart through an open letterbox from 20yards away. Mainly because i’d been off form for close to 3 weeks with a bad flu bug and cold which i was only just coming out the other side from.

All in all it was a brilliant day at one of the best bits of bouldering crags in the UK for side by side quality 7’s & 8’s.

 

On a tangent the other day some people i know were miffed when Jemma Powells new sandbag 7B+ was reported on UKC the other day, because of its "lowly grade” (and yes UKC’s ultra basic reporting didn’t help convey the overall important message here). Yet i was really chuffed to see that getting reported for a few reasons. The main one being that to my knowledge that it is one of the hardest boulder problems ever put up in the UK by a woman, something which is well worth drawing attention to (Nia Fletcher put up a 7B in the lakes recently and there are quite a few other female developers who have put up many a classic in the uk, Karin Magog Tess Fryer and Veronica Hunter to name a few. For some reason bouldering development in the UK is a very androcentric past time. Even though Trad and Sport climbing in the UK has had more female FA’s close to the cutting edge for their time (granted sport climbing has abated a bit since Ruth Jenkins and Karin Magog's 8’s) Yet at the minute we have many of the worlds most famous female boulderers operating in the UK. Obviously there are oodles of reasons for this, but it’s fantastic to see development reporting on the rise in the UK by Women (Leah and Shauna have put up harder boulders abroad) . But that isn’t the main reason to be out putting up new climbs, the main one is that its really fun, you don’t have to have climbed everything to develop new climbs, you simply need the desire to go into the unknown and find roughly what you’re looking for. It takes a different skillset and mindset to do this and i think it's very commendable when it happens. whether people share it with the world or not is up to them, but i am always glad when they do. There is a huge onus on international development at the cutting edge of the male sport right now, mainly because they warm up on last years test pieces nowadays and the more that development equals out between the sexes the better in my eyes. 


Anyhow, back to me. there’s a fantastic project near me at the minute that i am pretty sure is one of the problems i’ve been looking for my whole life without knowing it. It’s bizzare where they can turn up and i was smiling from limb to limb doing the moves on it the other day. 9m high 8Bish and everything on it, crimps, slopers, a pocket and subtlety with a 7B+ slopey font top out. Middle of nowhere, yet only a short drive from my house. A slightly harder, sandstone Lanny Bassham is a good summation, with a similarly involved approach. This is what gets me excited to be fettling away as a boulderer. Sometimes i develop things for both myself and the community and sometimes its for myself, this is a me line. That for me is why it’s worth heading out and sifting through all the crap crags that can be nearby. Once you’ve done the classics it’s worth trying to find more lines which are as good if not better. Of course a day has to come when they run out, but when you take places like Scotland into consideration that time is a long way off. It had seven new font 8’s added to it last year (possibly more if Mike Adam’s ascents on Skye get graded, i think Venom Jag had been done by Dave Mac before but Darken down is new). More than Wales and they roped Megos in for the best one... , it looks like it was the most new 8’s added in one year ever in the history of Scottish bouldering and it’s main (pretty much only) native hard bouldering developer was injured most of the year. Dave Macleod has put up some amazing problems in Scotland over the years. Triangulation is just one example of a benchmark classic power problem three star climbing and situation and 10 mins walk from the road and basically perma dry.

Here’s Gangle on the second ascent four years after it was put up. He uses pretty different beta but i couldn’t image two more contrasting climbing physiques. I got up it after tom with slightly different beta again.

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North of the wall

Posted on May 24, 2013 by Dan Varian


Cowal

Pic: Katie Mundy


I’ve had two more 2 day trips up to Scotland this year on my days off from Beastmaker and setting problems at Eden Rock when i’ve spotted good weather up there and i thought i’d share a little about what we’ve been up to. Katie and I have bought a T5 after being woo’ed by Jonesy’s T4 on trips up there and its already proving to be a great wingman. Scotland is a fantastic place to use vans and many a winter climber and tradder has known it for years. It’s been the coldest may since 1979 (met office data) and that hasn’t gone un noticed, i’ve had some fantastic conditions lately and i’ve only had one midge sighting which came on my last trip and it was with great satisfaction that it morphed into a little black smudge on my arm. 


Stand

Pic: Katie Mundy

Interestingly i’ve pretty much only climbed on one boulder up there when i’ve been fresh but it’s a cracker. I first heard it get mentioned when chatting to local developer Tom Charles Edwards about venues in the Arrochar alps area. A bit of web searching revealed a pic of a huge roll of turf flying off the top of said boulder but nothing more. Then i found a pic of Macleod staring up at a very steep face and so i thought; worth a look. so on a wet december day i took a look with Katie for something to do and was pretty amazed. You can see why good lines get talked about before they are done because they are so striking to whoever sees them. The boulder has two total classics on. The uniquest line is an incredible rising traverse that comes out of a square notch in the boulder and the only other holds on the entire 10m wide face force you leftwards and up towards the arete. A true face problem. I think a certain strong Scot had a look back in 2008ish but wrote it off as it didn’t quite go at the end. This was a bit worrying initially and there were old ticks when i got there. I thought it could be another classic, not quite there boulder, as is so often the case on many great features. I’ve always been one to let the rock decide though rather than reputations of things and upon getting there all the holds looked quite big to me, albeit undercuts with no feet and slopers and flatties on a 60 degree overhang. But at least there was stuff to work with. After years of climbing with Ned his bonkers beta has rubbed off on me over the years, i’ve had so many basic power sequences heeled and drop knee’d into submission that it becomes obvious that if there is a way of getting the feet to do the work then let them do it, save the arms for when feet aren’t there to help. So on my first session i let my arms and legs run wild. I thought i could spot the mythical blank impasse and sure enough after looking at the likely 50 megatonne power beta to do just that move the thought of climbing into it via more horrendous moves seemed like i’d have to move house and become a scottish hermit to get it done. So my sincere apologies to the incredible last great power project. 


pic: Nick Brown video still.

I long to find problems where i don’t have to resort to kneebars, heels and in this case, drop heels, double spag heels, double toes, leg threads and possibly a level 5 heel. God that looks bad on paper, its like a confessions list of crimes against power. The thing is they are awesome fun when it all works and comes together. I did all the moves on my first session with this cloud cuckoo land beta. Next session saw me drop the very last move from a logical stand halfway along the boulder. I had duff beta for the last few moves and i was disgusted to drop it there, especially when i found easier beta at the end. I had tried so hard i felt like a heavy horse seriously in need of a watering hole, it was well past 9pm and my last go just confirmed that my bolt was shot. Katie and I had a gorgeous dinner down by the castle. I felt a lot better with some food in me in such a tranquil place, i couldn’t agree more with the late Don Whillan’s sentiments when he says that climbing for him was about an excuse for getting into the mountains more than anything. To have dinner by such an ancient monument surrounded by the Cowal Glens is something i don’t want to forget. Its not hard to imagine the comings and goings of the last few hundred years whilst glancing from the castle northwards into the wind. As it licks up the water on the loch into a series of riffled swells; life must of been truly memorable for the people living there. Clarity hit me and this all seemed like a nice opportunity to come back. I knew the midge clock was ticking so i didn’t wait long. 

Tuesday saw me back up with Nick who is keen to film some development of areas. He’d had a relaxing weekend in Austria filming proper world cup celebs and what they eat for breakfast lunch and dinner so i thought i’d better sweeten the deal by offering him a bunk up in Van Diesel, the idea of a 2 day mini break appealed. We set off back up the road on tuesday and arrived to some rather good temps and a nice golden eagle sighting. Nicks little legs got a bit tired on the walk in but like all good camera chaps nowadays he likes to carry really heavy bits of metal about with him. I had an objective in mind, one hold to glory. Luckily i’ve been feeling quite good of late on the rocks and i did the stand at the end of my warm up with the new last move beta. I don’t know how hard it is exactly as the beta is so bonkers, to me it felt like an 8A/+ but who knows, it’s so steep it doesn’t compare to many blocks except for the bowderstone and some stuff at dumby/ glen nevis. Time will tell anyhow. Thanks to doing it from stand quick i had time to refine the sit into it a little bit. This is certainly the most obvious start but at over 30moves i thought it was worth splitting the problem up into a stand and sit and its easy to pull on where i did the stand from. The sit adds some truly whacky and powerful moves into the stand up and it’ll be a formidable challenge once done. It’s not traditionally my style of boulder as i’ve grown up in England where the boulders tend to be smaller and the the holds too on many of the boulders (because they are less steep). So i feel a bit like a 2-10move climber attempting a route. I managed a pretty good link from sit though so if i can get my fitness up then i’ll be keen. 


pic: Nick Brown video still.

But for now feel free to make the effort and take a look if you fancy a massive power endurance 8B+ish boulder. Its nice to share projects like this as it was never mine to begin with, lots of other great Scottish climbers helped put the effort in to getting it climbable and solid. The line deserves to be done rather than get forgotten as it was certainly going that way and it’d be fantastic to see Scotland with more amazing hard boulders as it is certainly one of the finest places to boulder in the UK in my opinion. Dumby has even been cleaned up now, which is a genuinely inspiring thing to see in terms of strength of community.


sit proj

Pic: Dan Varian

After working the traverse i thought i’d see if i could do the arete to the right from sit as it’d been bugging me after doing it from crouch the week before (if you used 2 pads you could sit i guess). Dave Jones climbed the stand with me a few weeks before after a days skiing in fort william and we both ran out of gas from crouch, Dave had an awesome go where he crushed his way up to the stand holds but the fumes evaporated and we both left wanting more. We wrote off the sit that day as it seemed unfathomable compared to the obvious crouch. After a bit of brain crunching again i found a possible solution and then much to my mutual disgust and pleasure figured it out. Disgust because i’d just usurped my previous efforts on a classic boulder, but pleasure because there is an obvious start sidepull “jug” and it feels right starting from there. By this time i was feeling the few hours of climbing on the traverse but i thought i saw a possible window of success there. 2 strong goes left me on the ground at the stand up due to a messed up body position. One more go saw me get to the very last move of the stand before it relents totally gassed with my hand opening up on the crimp. My number was up and deja vu from the week before hit me. Another castle dinner was called for to make up for the crippling failure which had tainted the success of the day.


pic: Nick Brown video still.

A tranquil night by the loch brought round a new day. We decided to change tune. I’d never been to precious or Turbinal Nose in Glen Croe and i thought it’d be a nice relaxing day out on some classics! We headed straight up to Precious after a brew at Loch Goilhead what a fantastic boulder. There weren’t many warm ups but i pretty much felt warm from the day before still. upon topping it out i noticed the top of the line to the left was clean. Clean schist shimmers in the sun as its metallic flakes catch the light and its a pretty thing to look at. I had a quick play on the upper wall above semi precious which’d give it a great independent finish, it’ll definitely go. My mind was elsewhere though, the sun was pinning me to the shade but shimmering round the corner was a fantastic highball line. At first i thought it looked pretty easy but the boulder overhangs a lot more than the eyes suggest from front on. As the clouds came i ran round, did battle, sun came back out, ran away. I gradually broke it down ground up like this for about an hour, getting more and more frustrated by the testing weather and an infuriating foothold (by this point some showers and hail had popped by too) but like a bad itch it’d got under my skin. I was tired, skin sore and being hammered by sun and rain but that just added to the challenge. I appreciate scenarios like this now, whereas in the past i may have walked away. I wanted to find that window of success and it was all over the place. As the afternoon drew in i began to wake up more. I got through the bottom crux only to find another one high up and dirty holds. I’ve done a lot of new problems in the last 12 years and even as a lowly 25year old i feel pretty wizened now as to how to do battle with a project. Basically if i wanted to stand a chance of doing it in a day i had to throw the true ground up ascent out the window and change tac. The abseil rope was retrieved from the van and i got the top cleaned and sorted the moves. I’d long pushed past my comfort zone and my skin was sore but i knew that was all just a test. In the back of my mind i knew there was a chance if i could just hit all the holds and positions right, somehow all that happened. I pulled it out the bag and it felt good. Its a fantastic problem, crimping up some 25degree overhanging schist on off kilter edges and really dicky feet. you could possibly add a sit into it from the precious start too which would make it harder. Sit starts to highballs aren’t something i usually go for but it looks like it could be a good one. Its start holds are on a leftwards trending rail which would also make a brilliant problem.


pic: Nick Brown video still.

I’d like to call it Stronghold as its on the hideaway boulder and i think its soft 8Aish? its a good bit harder than precious anyhow. Many thanks to Alex Gorham for doing the majority of cleaning on the line its inspiring to see the glens getting some attention.


pic: Nick Brown video still.


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Beastmaking...

Posted on March 18, 2013 by Ned Feehally

We have a new machine! It's a laser cutter/engraver. It's very exciting. We are now engraving our fingerboards with it, the finish is great and it is much faster than the engraving process we used to use, leaving us more time to make more fingerboards.

The laser is great for loads of other stuff too - we have been fiddling around with it and making a few new bits and bobs. Our latest product isn't exactly ground breaking but it should be pretty handy to most climbers... 

     

The Beast Maintainer is a little sanding board you can use to keep your skin in fine fettle as you climb. Smooth, even skin is important for getting maximum friction out of the rock and avoiding nasty splits, tears and holes.

Apart from this, we have been very busy making fingerboards for everyone as well as tinkering with some other new products - which should be more exciting but no less pretty than the Beast Maintainers. 

          

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